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Spay and Neuter


 

If you have recently adopted a pet or are thinking about it, one of the most vital health choices you will make is to spay or neuter your pet. Spaying a female pet is a veterinary practice that involves minimal hospitalization and presents lifelong health benefits. Neutering, the removal of reproductive organs in male pets will radically improve your pet’s behavior and prevent them from escaping from home. Spaying or neutering your fur-baby will not change their personality or character.

Here are some of the medical benefits:

Female pets will live a longer, and healthier life. Spaying helps prevent uterine infections and breast tumors. It is recommended to spay your pet before her first heat to best protect her from these diseases. Neutering male pets prevents testicular cancer and prostate irregularities.

Here are some of the behavioral benefits:

Spayed female pets will not go into heat. Females will usually go into heat once every three weeks. In an effort to search for a partner they howl and urinate more often (sometimes in the house) to attract a mate.

Neutered male dogs are less likely to roam away from home. A male will do anything to find a mate, including finding inventive ways to escape from the house. Once he has left the house, the risk of injury in traffic or in fights with other animals is high.

Neutered male dogs are better behaved. Unfixed cats and dogs are more likely to mark their territory by spraying strong-odored urine inside the house. Many times aggression problems are solved after a pet has been fixed.

When to Spay or Neuter Your Pet?

For dogs: We recommend that dogs are neutered at about six months of age, or before their first heat. Dogs can also be sterilized as adults, however the risk of post-operative complications is higher, especially in older dogs that are overweight or dogs that have health problems.

For cats: Kittens as young as eight weeks of age can be spayed or neutered. Kittens are usually sterilized prior to adoption in an effort to avoid the habit of urine spraying and eliminating chances of unwanted pregnancy.

Spay and Neuter


If you have recently adopted a pet or are thinking about it, one of the most vital health choices you will make is to spay or neuter your pet. Spaying a female pet is a veterinary practice that involves minimal hospitalization and presents lifelong health benefits. Neutering, the removal of reproductive organs in male pets will radically improve your pet’s behavior and prevent them from escaping from home. Spaying or neutering your fur-baby will not change their personality or character.

Here are some of the medical benefits:

Female pets will live a longer, and healthier life. Spaying helps prevent uterine infections and breast tumors. It is recommended to spay your pet before her first heat to best protect her from these diseases. Neutering male pets prevents testicular cancer and prostate irregularities.

Here are some of the behavioral benefits:

Spayed female pets will not go into heat. Females will usually go into heat once every three weeks. In an effort to search for a partner they howl and urinate more often (sometimes in the house) to attract a mate.

Neutered male dogs are less likely to roam away from home. A male will do anything to find a mate, including finding inventive ways to escape from the house. Once he has left the house, the risk of injury in traffic or in fights with other animals is high.

Neutered male dogs are better behaved. Unfixed cats and dogs are more likely to mark their territory by spraying strong-odored urine inside the house. Many times aggression problems are solved after a pet has been fixed.

When to Spay or Neuter Your Pet?

For dogs: We recommend that dogs are neutered at about six months of age, or before their first heat. Dogs can also be sterilized as adults, however the risk of post-operative complications is higher, especially in older dogs that are overweight or dogs that have health problems.

For cats: Kittens as young as eight weeks of age can be spayed or neutered. Kittens are usually sterilized prior to adoption in an effort to avoid the habit of urine spraying and eliminating chances of unwanted pregnancy.

AL WASL CLINIC

800-82
mvc@vetdubai.com

Umm Suqeim, Al Wasl Road, Villa #793, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

JVC CLINIC

800-82
mvcjvc@vetdubai.com

Platinum Residences, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

JLT CLINIC

800-82
mvcjlt@vetdubai.com

Fortune Tower, Cluster C, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

AL WASL CLINIC

800-82
mvc@vetdubai.com

Umm Suqeim, Al Wasl Road, Villa #793, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

JLT CLINIC

800-82
mvcjlc@vetdubai.com

Fortune Tower, Cluster C, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

JLT CLINIC

800-82
mvcjlc@vetdubai.com

Fortune Tower, Cluster C, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

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